Garlic Myths, Superstitions, and Folklore

Here at the Garlic Headquarters we love reading about garlic and all the crazy things people have used it for throughout history! We wanted to share with you some of our favourite garlic tales:

– In the past, braided garlic was hung up to drive away evil spirits. Brides-to-be were “beaten” with garlic stalks to protect them from future illness and ensure that they bore healthy children.

– In the middle age, garlic was worn around the neck to keep werewolves at bay, and was hung above doorways to guard against evil forces.

– Dreaming that there is “garlic in the house” is supposedly lucky; to dream about eating garlic means you will discover hidden secrets.

– Roman soldiers ate garlic to inspire them and give them courage. Because the Roman generals believed that garlic gave their armies courage, they planted fields of garlic in the countries they conquered, believing that courage was transferred to the battlefield.

– Garlic was placed by the ancient Greeks on the piles of stones at cross-roads, as a supper for Hecate — a goddess of the wilderness and childbirth, or for protection from demons. The garlic was supposed to the evil spirits and cause them to lose their way.

– The Koreans of old ate pickled garlic before passing through a mountain path, believing that tigers disliked it.

– Garlic and onions were invoked as deities by the Egyptians at the taking of oaths.

– During the reign of King Tut, fifteen pounds of garlic would buy a healthy male slave. Indeed, when King Tut’s tomb was excavated, there were bulbs of garlic found scattered throughout the rooms.

– In Mohammed’s writings, he equates garlic with Satan when he describes the feet of the Devil as he was cast out of the Garden of Eden. Where his left foot touched the earth, garlic sprang up, while onion emerged from the footprint of his right foot.

– European folklore gives garlic the ability to ward off the “evil eye”. Central European folk beliefs considered garlic a powerful ward against devils, werewolves, and vampires. To ward off vampires, garlic could be worn on one’s person, hung in windows, or rubbed on chimneys and keyholes. When diseases caused by mosquito bites were considered “The touch of the vampire,” garlic came in handy as a mosquito repellent.

Pretty cool, isn’t it? We want know – fact or fiction? What do you think about these stories??

Tweet us at @discovergarlic, email us at discovergarlic@gmail.com, send us a video response on our YouTube account or post your reply below! We want to hear from you!

Sources: http://americanfolklore.net/folklore/2010/10/garlic_superstitions_folklore.html, http://www.hammergarlic.com/myths.htm

Welcome!

We are so excited that you’re joining our campaign celebrating the joys of our favourite ingredient – Garlic! Whether you’re a seasoned chef, a beginner, or just simply love to eat – there is something for everyone on this blog! We hope you will stay a while, and enjoy the variety of recipes, videos, facts, news and more that we will be posting when we go live from April 1st to April 5th! Do you know a fun fact about garlic? Do you have a delicious garlic-themed recipe you would like to share? We want to hear from you! #Discover Garlic will be taking over social media spreading the excitement and you can help! Tweet us, follow us on Instagram, Pin us on Pinterest, Subscribe to our YouTube channel, email us at discovergarlic@gmail.com and comment on our blog posts!

We hope you enjoy your stay!

– The Discover Garlic Team

“And, most dear actors, eat no onions nor garlic, for we are to utter sweet breath.”

– William Shakespeare, A midsummer night´s dream